Don't any of you bitches read?

Stuff that just doesn't fit anywhere else. (As if our other threads don't run off topic already.)
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Baile
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Postby Baile » Thu Jan 19, 2006 7:08 am

Ok now it makes sense, I need to go get the Talisman and read that to make it all come together.

Thanks I will also pick up those 2 books too.
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Postby Fluke » Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:35 pm

Anyone out there got a review for War & Peace? I was thinking about giving this monster a go and I'd love to hear anything you alls have to say about it.
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Postby Lightfeather » Tue Jan 24, 2006 2:08 pm

It's very big.
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Postby skuppy » Tue Jan 24, 2006 2:14 pm

I heard that Tolstoy's original title was going to be War, What is it Good For

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Postby Kiawah » Tue Jan 24, 2006 2:29 pm

I've read war and peace and crime and punishment (c&p is one of my fav books of all time). The books themselves are incredible, really some of the best stuff ever put on paper (although there are parts of the book you can just skip over entirely, its just rambling). It can be a very slow-moving book, like everything in Russia, and really mind-numbing in certain parts especially the beginning.

The problem most people have is getting through the length of the book and the long long long long Russian names. Russians carry with them like 50 surnames, each 50 letters long that only someone who drinks Vodka every day can pronounce. If you can keep all the names straight and don't mind reading a book the size of an elephant, you'll have some of the best reading there is.

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Postby Uri » Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:41 am

While I haven't tackled War and Peace yet, I did read The Brothers Karamazov recently and can vouch for Kia's remarks on the meatiness of Russian surnames. :)

English books are a pain in the ass to buy here, and very expensive, so we just trade books among other expats. I just read "Cold Mountain" (I didn't have too much to choose from...:(), and even though I shy away from Oprahs book club type books, this was actually really, really good. The imagery was downright fantastic, the guy obviously spent a shitoad of time researching the period, otherwise he never could have been as succesfully descriptive. For example, (I can't quote it because my wife already traded the book to another expat for a pile of women's magazines) at one point he describes the flesh of a catfish one of the main characters caught. I can't recall the words he used too describe it, but there is no way you'd ever be able to come up with the description he used if you hadn't at some point held a big, raw catfish filet in your hand. Anyhow, a good book, with much less love story than I had feared.

I'm also reading Harry Potter in german, to my grandmother. And I got a GORGEOUS hardback of LOTR in german, but I need to improve my german for a few years before I can handle that. But now, I'm going through the books I brought, and re-reading Heinlein, books of fishing short stories, and John D. MacDonald. I recently re-read the Stand, and "Penguin's Concise History of the World", all on my morning and evening train commutes. Now I'm working on some old Jack London paperback that ain't bad. But damn, am I starved for good reading material. Hey! I just remembered that I have the first two Robert Jordan books that I never read because I cound't get into them, I'll bet I can now. ;)

My best friend in the states is sending me a box of books, including A Feast for Crows. :) I'm very excited, but its coming ground, so it will be here in 6 weeks(!) and no doubt covered in camel piss or something.
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Postby Ved » Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:56 am

I'm reading a lot more now that I'm not playing wow (and nwo that I'm selling books)

Running with the Demon - Terry Brooks
The book wasn't bad but it honestly belongs in the young adult section. Its set in modern america with fantasy/magic elements. The two main characters fit in the same archetypes you see in his other books: The old man singlehandely struggling against the evil of the world (Allanon/Walker) and the young girl (Wren/Wil) blessed/cursed with the gift of magic she doesn't quite understand. The modern setting is interesting but not really well developed and the plot is predictable. The book is best at the beginning when everything is still a mystery.
3/5

The Power of Myth - Joseph Campbell
This is a really great interview style book with Bill Moyers interviewing campbell (who is sort of the father of analyzing mythlogy). Its sort of an expanded transcript of an award winning pbs series of the same name. Campbell wrote over 10 books and this one basically touches on the key points in all of them. He talks about why myths are so compelling and why we hear the same sorts of stories over and over again. He talks about how all religous/mythological stories are metaphorical and are meant to be used to better understand your own life by drawing parallels. Just a really great read for anyone interested in thinking about mythology/religion/the big picture.
4.5/5

Black Money - Ross MacDonald
I have this thing for hard boiled film noir type private detective stories. The thing about this one is that it is actually well written! It has all the elements of what is best about noir: bit by bit peeling away the masks of people living the good life (great gatsby anyone) to reveal the corruption, selfishness, and greed lurking just below. The main character is a blunt spoken private detective who manages to do the right thing even when his job puts him into the worst kind of human cesspools. The plot was just ok but the characters all seemed so real, because they were so flawed. The dialogue is fantastic.
4/5
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Postby Tamayo » Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:16 pm

Well I never noticed this thread before, so I'm gonna pimp out this fantasy series I discovered. They say not to judge a book by it's cover, but I did with this series and I ended up not being disappointed at all.

It is the Symphony of Ages series by Elizabeth Haydon. I really like this series because it isn't exactly like your typical fantasy with elves, orcs, dwarves and all that stuff, there are races similar to them but different enough that its a refreshing change of pace. There are alot of musical references and much of the magic type things that happen are based on music, singing or playing melodies on an instrument. It centers on 3 main characters, a young woman who is a singer, a huge 7+ foot tall sergeant major (similar to an orc) who is a weapons master and his partner who is an assassin who can track people based on their heartbeats. The two men meet her while they are on the run from a demon, and it turns out she is also on the run from this corrupt soldier. They "team up" and leave the city eventually coming upon one of the massive world trees that give the planet its life (thing the tree in Warcraft 3, only much much bigger), the only way they can escape is underground along the roots of this tree. Their journey underground takes them literally through the center of the planet and they emerge on the otherside and everything is completely different. They eventually find out that around 1000 years has passed in the time that they were traveling. And basically its we see the relationships of these characters evolve, and see how they deal with being in a strange place where they have no other friends or allies, and how they uncover the mysteries of what has actually happened to them and to the world. There are alot of other characters that come along, and eventually they get wrapped up in various conflicts going on in the new land. The characters are really the best part of this series, they're so detailed and full of personality, you really grow to love them. The world is also very detailed, theres lots of history and events you learn about, and theres lots of good action, surprises and all that good stuff. So go out and read it!

So far there are 5 books in the series out right now, and one coming soon:
1. Rhapsody - Child of Blood
2. Prophecy - Child of Earth
3. Destiny - Child of the Sky

4. Requiem for the Sun
5. Elegy for a Lost Star
6. The Assassin King (coming out next year)

___

On a side note, one of my guilty pleasures is Star Wars books, I dunno if anyone here is into these, but I also recommend Timothy Zahn's new book Outbound Flight. If anyone has read his previous books, you can guess what to expect out of this one. Ties up alot of the loose ends in the SW EU, and you learn just what happened to the Outbound Flight Project and the origins of ... dun dun dunnnn... Grand Admiral Thrawn. If you're into SW books definitely check this one out.
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Postby Uri » Sun Apr 30, 2006 2:20 am

I'm so excited, I just got a box full of books from a very generous friend in the states, they include the following:

A Feast for Crows - George R.R. Martin
The Protector's War - S.M. Stirling (Sequel to a book I read earlier, and gave it a poorish review earlier in this thread, but whatever, it's a book)
Cell - Stephen King
Polaris & A Tale for War - Jack McDevitt
Men at Arms & Feet of Clay - Terry Prattchet
Marque and Reprisal & Trading in Danger - Elizabeth Moon

Woot!
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Postby Uri » Mon May 08, 2006 12:23 am

"Cell" by Stephen King

I had no idea what this book was about until I started reading it, I didn't expect the post-apocalyptic, zombieesque book it turned out to be, though a very unique take on the genre. Without ruining too much of the story, the basic premise is that cell phone all of a sudden emit some sort of mind-altering pulse, turning those annoying cell phone users into mindless, violent zombies. However, they soon seem to evolve into a form unprecedented in zombie history.

I liked the book, though the Stephen King shows his lack of knowledge of computers on quite a few occasions, something that will no doubt annoy some of you. The book is sort of short, some things go unexplained (such as the origin of the cell phone pulse) and the ending is quite the cliffhanger.
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Postby PopnFresh » Mon May 08, 2006 3:27 pm

Uri wrote:"Cell" by Stephen King

I had no idea what this book was about until I started reading it, I didn't expect the post-apocalyptic, zombieesque book it turned out to be, though a very unique take on the genre. Without ruining too much of the story, the basic premise is that cell phone all of a sudden emit some sort of mind-altering pulse, turning those annoying cell phone users into mindless, violent zombies. However, they soon seem to evolve into a form unprecedented in zombie history.

I liked the book, though the Stephen King shows his lack of knowledge of computers on quite a few occasions, something that will no doubt annoy some of you. The book is sort of short, some things go unexplained (such as the origin of the cell phone pulse) and the ending is quite the cliffhanger.


That kind of story really bugs me. It's something I'm trying to get over; I need to get through my head that it's not the story setup that makes the story, it's the way it all pans out. But it still really rubs me wrong when I see ridiculous cliches like "what if this device we used every day TURNED US INTO ZOMBIES" being used to set up a book. It's like the Family Guy where they parody King saying his next book will be about a "vicious lamp monster! rawr!" Maybe he'll follow it up with a book with anti-TV undertones! "If you keep watching television, then your T.V. will start making demon babies!"

Which Heinlein are you reading? "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" was a sweet one of his. Obviously "Stranger in a Strange Land" is one of his more famous, and "Starship Troopers" is solid and very much unlike the movie (which I liked, but for totally different reasons).
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Postby Baile » Mon May 08, 2006 6:35 pm

A lot of good it does me to read books when I suffer from CRS disease so bad. However, I know I read "Stranger in a Strange Land" and although I can't remember what the hell it was about now, I do remember I loved it when I read it.

Oh and CRS = Can't Remember Shit
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Postby Lightfeather » Mon May 08, 2006 7:34 pm

What's awesome about CRS disease, as I too am a sufferer, is that you can build a small library of favorite books, read them over and over again and they feel new every single time.

Perpetual entertainment! <3

I just finished re-reading stranger in a strange land and to give your memory a little kick in the pants it's about a man from mars who was born human but raised like a Martian. He came back to earth and "shared water" with a nurse who then became his "water brother".

He attempted to grok humans and was enraptured when he took his first bath. Being immersed in the water of life was something no Martian had ever done as far as he was awear.

His people could discorporate at will and to eat the body of one who has discorporated was to "grok" them fully.

Blah blah blah... book is pretty religious and the main character is representative of a christ like figure who could perform miracles and... well... I don't want to spoil it for anyone who hasn't finished it yet.
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Postby Uri » Mon May 08, 2006 11:46 pm

PopnFresh wrote:Which Heinlein are you reading? "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" was a sweet one of his. Obviously "Stranger in a Strange Land" is one of his more famous, and "Starship Troopers" is solid and very much unlike the movie (which I liked, but for totally different reasons).


I've read close to all of them at this point. The one I read most recently, and I forgot the name, is, I think, one of Heinlein's post-stroke books so it's all wierd and sexual. It's about the old guy who has his brain put in the body of his hot young secretary, and casual and group sex abounds. Not the best book ever, by any means. :(
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Postby Ved » Thu Jun 22, 2006 10:58 am

I highly recommend: The Path Between The Seas for anybody that likes reading about history. The panama canal is amazing from an engineering standpoint, but even more interesting was the political backstabbing, manuevering, and all the crazy characters that were involved in making it eventually happen. The author really takes you back and puts you there with a little bit of a cynical eye. By just examining the making of the canal you start to understand politics and even everday life for people in that era. Some of the things that happen seem incredibly foreign and some I could see happen even today.

For example, the country of Panama didn't exist until the united states created it to sign a canal treaty with so they wouldn't have to deal with Colombia. Don't want to deal with the united states? Teddy Roosevelt figures we'll just take over part of your country and prop up a puppet government.
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Postby Grendal » Thu Jun 22, 2006 11:02 am

The 2006 Staples Business Catalog is a good read. It has "UNBELIEVABLE!" as its slogan but the prices are pretty believable.

I read it today on the shitter because frankly, the Office 2003 Quick User's Guide was pretty boring.

Getting back to the Staples catalog, it's okay I guess. The pictures are great, but the prices aren't. It's like twice as much to get a spindle of 100 CDs from them as it is from Best Buy.

Anyway, I give this Catalog

2 Toilet Paper Rolls out of 5

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Postby Baile » Thu Jun 22, 2006 12:26 pm

I think that is the 2nd or 3rd time today you have made me bust out laughing.

Thankee Grendizzle
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Postby DandyoftheHighSeas » Sun Jun 25, 2006 10:27 pm

So I started reading more lately, and I began with Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

Quite frankly, I don't know where to start. I really guess that the beginning page really sums it up.

And what is good, Phaedrus
And what is not good
Need we ask anyone to tell us these things?


After reading, I suppose that I started to think of things...a little...wierdly. I don't know. I've never done anything like it before.

I know, I'm a noob at reading, so bear with me.
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Postby skuppy » Fri Jul 07, 2006 6:29 pm

I'm about 1/4 of the way through The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler. Took me about 20 pages to go remember that I had already read the book in high school! But it's such a good book that I'm enjoying it the second time through, maybe even appreciate it a little more this time around.
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Postby Sord » Tue Sep 05, 2006 5:36 am

Mmmmm books. I've finished this series of books recently written by Kim Harrison. For anyone who likes Anita Blake or Harry Dresden books, you'll probably enjoy these. However the latest in the series, Fistful of Charms, is really a letdown. In a world of monsters and magic she can't find a antagonist? Apparently not, she has to fuck up one of the more interesting main characters and make him the "bad guy" which makes no sense to me. In her previous books, they characters were funny and had some interesting adventures. This one is just a bunch of the main character female crying and everyone calling the "bad guy" 'crap for bains.' Like on every other page. Yeah that doesn't get old. :roll: Anyhow, as long as it doesn't turn into an undead pornography series like the Anita Blake books did, I'll probably try the next few out but let me tell you its getting pretty close. I liked the character she fucked up, I'm curious to see if they'll fix things or if she can make him into an interesting bad guy.

Another book that I picked up at random and was surprised at how decent it was is His Majesty's Dragon. Its kind of a twist on history focusing on the Napoleonic era. While the British and French each have their naval fleet and ground troops, they also ride around dragons like a historic air force. I've started the 2nd book, Throne of Jade and I admit its a bit harder to get into than the first. I'm sure it will pick up, I just need the motivation to drudge past the beginning.
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Postby Waits » Tue Sep 05, 2006 3:46 pm

Some books that I dig...if anyone cares.

"Black Sping" by Henry Miller

"Ham on Rye" Charles Bukowski

"The Jungle" Upton Sinclair

Aye, pretty much anything by the two above and anything by Steinbeck.

The only fantasy/ horror that I am really into is the LOTR stuff and Lovecraft.

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Postby skuppy » Sat Sep 09, 2006 7:09 pm

I just finished the first five books from Terry Pratchet's Discworld.

The Light Fantastic
The Colour of Magic
Equal Rights
Mort
Sourcery

It's hard not to like them, just sit down and enjoy no matter what your mood, it's almost too easy. Although I did get the feeling that he was trying a little to hard to be Douglas Adams. I haven't read a traditional fantasy book in years because the genre is nothing more than one giant cliche at this point, but these books are rather refreshing. My only complaint is that since each book is designed to be stand alone, you can read these in any order or no order at all, he often repeats himself from book to book on key concepts, often verbatim.
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Postby Ugluk » Sun Sep 10, 2006 8:32 pm

Terry Pratchet made a children's book called Where's My Cow, featuring Sam Vimes reading to Young Sam, and in the second half he includes some characters from the books, which we have not read. Heidi loved the book because the illustrations were very well done, but the cashier (female) started going on about how good Pratchet's books are. Eventually Heidi bought one and read a little ways but it didn't hold her interest.

Still, I recommend the children's book, "Where's my cow".

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Postby Gemfire » Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:34 pm

Just finished reading a book that i randomly grabbed off a "summer reading" table at barnes and noble cause i had nothing to read and was sick of watching soaps when the kids napped.

Turned out to be one of my ultimate "impossible to put down" type books.

Tis called "The other Boleyn girl" by phillipa gregory.

Its the second in the unofficial series, but i only just discovered that there are others, its also totally fine to read on its own. It follows the life of Mary Boleyn (Sister of Anne Boleyn who features in british royal history) from her marriage at age12/13 (cant remember exactly) and her journey through the court of King Henry VIII.

There is a book that i assume should be read before it, though it's written as a prequel, about Queen Katherine (the constant princess) and then two after it based around future characters that were introduced in this one. Weather you know the history or not its a very interesting read....... though of course i will admit since its following a girl through a royal court it may be more of a girl book.....

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Postby Nelora » Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:46 pm

I've read that, and really enjoyed it... I haven't read anything else by her yet.
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